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Music That I Pay for, & Why You Should Pay for it, Too

When I was a kid all I cared about was buying music.

Every week when I got paid from whatever dinky job I was working (solely to support this cd-purchasing habit), I would cash my check, head to the mall and salivate down the aisles of Best Buy until I picked out whatever obscure-ass shit my 7th grade self was listening to.

By the time I graduated high-school I had a massive music collection which I kept alphabetized in a humongous booklet. I was meticulous with my CDs; they were in perfect condition.

In college I was spoiled and able to get new music for free from the radio station I DJed at. This was around the same time that Metallica started ruining free music distribution for everybody- and my college campus didn’t allow file-sharing programs- so the radio station thing worked out nicely. Plus, being a college student meant I was way too poor to shell out $17.99 for an album that may or may not suck.

Now, at age 23, I’m in a position where I can afford to pay for my music. And with Itunes becoming the predominant (and reasonably priced!!!) way to get such things, I’m back on the cd-a-week bandwagon. Giddyup!

Check out what I’ve been digging on over the last few weeks…

CAMP BISCO 9 : Bigger, Longer & Uncut

It’s hard to believe that it’s already been two weeks since music lovers from across the country met, in a 200-acre field just west of Albany known simply to them as ILCC. Indian Lookout Country Club is normally home to The Harley Rendezvous – a biker festival.  But for the past three years the bikers have lent their land to another group of social rebels for one glorious weekend of the summer. This year, Camp Bisco 9 called ILCC home from July 15-17 and along with it came 15,000 fans, adorned in their most outrageous and colorful outfits (a.k.a. “rage gear”).

This year was my fourth Camp Bisco, and also my fourth time at ILCC.  Although I had the inclination this year would be bigger than others in the past, I wasn’t expecting the amount of people and traffic we endured that Thursday morning.  After four long hours of sitting in our cars and waiting in the sweltering heat we finally made it through the gates.  It was an exciting moment, but there was no time to relax.